How do you choose the right font?

Fonts come in all kinds of styles. With so many to choose from, it can be hard for a developer to know where to start. Your brand and voice are identifiable by your colors, photos, other design elements as well as the fonts that you choose.

How do you choose the right font?
Photo by Florian Pircher from Pixabay

Use these following tips to help select that fonts that enhance your design.

1. What type of personality matches your brand’s tone?

Are you Traditional, Reliable or Respectable? If so, you want to choose traditional fonts like Butler, Georgia or Times New Roman.

How about Contemporary, Modern or Progressive? Try modern fonts like Simplifica, Raleway or Prime.

Or are you Strong, Bold or Stable? Strong fonts like Glamour, Code or Nexa might work for you.

Maybe you want to convey Elegance, Vintage or Romance. Try handwritten script fonts like Allura, Sofia or Pinyon Script.

If those don’t fit you, you may need a more custom or unique font. Stylish fonts like Butch or Moon may work for you.

2. Is the font easy to read?

Do you have to concentrate to read the words? If you are getting exhausted trying to reading the font, then your customers will too. You want them to be able to read without any effort.

3. Does it look good in different situations?

You want to choose a font that looks no matter what you do to it. When you bold or italicized it. It should be easy to read when large and small. Some fonts look better on top of photos. Your brand colors can affect how readable the font is.

4. Do the fonts look good together?

After you have chosen the type of fonts that convey your personality, you want to pair fonts that compliment each other. You’ll need to decide how your headlines, content and calls to action will look like. Pairing fonts can be challenging. You can learn the basics for choosing fonts that fit your personality.

You can use these additional resources for pairing fonts:

Where can I get fonts?

5 CSS Frameworks For Your Next Project

What CSS Frameworks do you use? A framework like Bootstrap can be customize to suit your needs. Sometimes you have override the standard styles to get the design to work. You may want to use a framework that is flexible and doesn’t make design decisions for you. Here are 5 frameworks that you can use in your next project.

5 CSS Frameworks For Your Next Project
Photo by Shopify Partners from Burst

Pure CSS

Pure.css is small, responsive CSS framework. It allows you to easily create your own styles while providing responsive layout and common UI components. Pure.css is flexible that you can use it with other frameworks like Bootstrap without any issues. Monty Shokeen explains how you can start using [this framework] (https://www.sitepoint.com/introducing-pure-css-lightweight-responsive-framework/) in your next project.

Mini CSS

Mini.css is a minimal and responsive framework. You can quickly change the CSS file to make a custom design. It relies on CSS for the styling, so it won’t conflict with any JavaScript library that you need to use.

Bulma

Bulma is a CSS framework that is based on Flexbox. It is responsive, modular and free. Bulma is easy to learn and customize. You don’t need JavaScript to get started using this framework.

Tailwind CSS

Tailwind CSS is a different from other CSS frameworks. It provides utility classes that make it easy to rapidly build custom user interfaces. Tailwind doesn’t make design decisions for you. You can create a completely custom design without having to overriding a bunch of pre-built classes.

Materialize CSS

Materialize is a modern, responsive framework based on Material Design. You can choose to use the standard version with CSS and JavaScript or the SCSS version. With the Standard version, you can get started right away. The SCSS requires a Sass compiler.

When choosing a framework for your next project, you may want a small and minimal one or something that works with your existing styles. These 5 provide you with different options to help create a custom user experience.

5 Ways to Organize Your CSS

How do you write and organize your CSS? Do you prefer to use a structured method or not? With CSS, you can choose to use an existing method or develop your own. Some CMSes like WordPress have their own styles. When you use them, you need to follow their rules and guidelines.

5 Ways to Organize Your CSS
Photo by Photo Mix from Pixabay

Your styles can get big, messy and convoluted over time. It can be hard to maintain. You don’t know what you can delete or change because you aren’t sure what problems it will cause. Without a method for organizing, it may get harder and harder to keep things straight. You can choose to use BEM, OOCSS, SMACSS, Atomic CSS or build your own.

BEM

BEM is a way of writing CSS created by Yandex. It is a very structured style of writing CSS. BEM has a component-based approach. This approach divides the user interface into separate components. BEM uses the structure of Block, Element and Modifier. It makes development easy and fast to update.

OOCSS

OOCSS (object-oriented CSS) applies principles of object-oriented languages to help you write CSS. It encourages code reuse and makes it easier to maintain. OOCSS uses the object-oriented principle of abstraction to make the code reusable. It helps you to separate visual elements like color, fonts and borders from the content. This separation makes your code easier to update. Especially when you need to change colors, fonts or other branding-related items.

SMACSS

SMACSS is more of a style guide than a CSS architecture. Scalable and Modular Architecture for CSS provides guidelines for writing CSS. This style guide helps you build CSS that is flexible and maintainable. With SMACSS, you create your own rules for writing CSS.

Atomic CSS

Atomic CSS focuses on small, single-purposed classes. You build well-structured HTML templates, so that your changes doesn’t break your design.

Your Own Style

When you build a website on your own or part of a small team, you can choose how you write your CSS. You may combine methods to help solve certain design problems.

How do you choose a method?

It depends. When you are working on your own project, you can choose which one you want to use. When you are working on a project that uses a CSS framework, it may be easier to use the method that the framework uses.

The best way to learn which one you like is to read the documentation and build a project with it. Then, you’ll know when to use these methods.

Add Simple CSS Animation to Your UI

When you create a web page, you use tools like fonts, colors, photos, illustrations and shapes to draw attention to important parts and guide the user on how to use your page. Another tool that you can add to help convey information is animation. Animation allows you to add movement or motion on your page. People are hardwired to respond and react to movement. By adding animation, we can use it as another technique for communicating with our users.

Add Simple CSS Animation to Your UI
Photo by: Image by Ambady Sasi from Pixabay

Why use animation?

Animation helps you to draw people’s attention the part of the page that has changed, show users where to look next or highlight the arrival or removal of important information. You can use it for telling a story, branding and improving your user’s experience.

What do you need to remember when adding animation?

  • Don’t animate everything. Use it sparingly. Animation should help guide people on using your page not distract or confuse them.
  • Make sure it fits with your style or brand. If you are playful and not serious, you can use animation that has a playful aspect. If you are more serious, you want your animation to be simple and functional.
  • Don’t assume that your animation will work on all devices. You need to test, test and test again.

What kind of animations can I use?

You can add animations to a dashboard, web app or mobile only features. One popular method is to change the hamburger menu to an X. This change lets the user know that the menu can be closed. You can add animations to images on hover or in a gallery.

Hamburger Menu changes to an X

See the Pen
Animated – Hamburger Icon (spans)
by Steven Roberts (@matchboxhero)
on CodePen.

CSS Animation on Hover

See the Pen
Playing a CSS animation on hover
by Val Head (@valhead)
on CodePen.

Accordian Image Gallery

See the Pen
Accordion Image Gallery
by Stefan C. (@stefcharle)
on CodePen.

How can I learn more about animation?

CSS Animation Rocks
A CSS Animations Tutorial
CSS Tricks – Animation
Create Cool UI Animations in CSS

3 Dashboard Design Inspirations on CodePen

An easy to read dashboard has from 5-9 pieces of information on it. By combining color, fonts and icons, you can make a dashboard simple and easy to use. I found these three examples on CodePen that you can use to inspire your own designs.

3 Dashboard Designs CodePen
Photo by Lukas from Pexels

Bootstrap 4 Dashboard Stats Example

It shows 6 different statistics using Bootstrap 4. Each statistics is in a separate box that was built using the card layout. @elmorabityounes uses the default classes from Bootstrap to color the background, border and text. The text formatting is kept simple by using header tags to display the copy. Each box has its own icon from Font Awesome. The result is a simple design with no additional CSS or JavaScript.

Bootstrap Dashboard Indicators

When you design a dashboard, you’ll need to use different type of indictors to display information. Herman Starikov shows you how to use Bootstrap to create different indicators. He combines Font Awesome, Flexbox and CSS Animation. Herman also uses icons as decorative background elements. With CSS and Animation, your dashboard doesn’t have to be plain or boring.

Full Dashboard Design

CodePen Admin Dashboard

This complete Dashboard has a statistics, charts, a map and a chat box. Haidarali Nadi Shah demonstrates how to use Flat design, Font Awesome and JavaScript for functionality and additional theming. It includes a side menu bar that shrinks and expands when you click on it.

With the above examples, you can include different pieces of information in your design. You can choose to HTML and CSS, a CSS Framework like Bootstrap or include JavaScript to create more complex functionality. No matter what methods you choose, you can create a dashboard that provides your customers with the information that they need. Before you design your next dashboard, remember to review these 3 Dashboard Design Tips.